Goodness gracious

victoryfitnessblog:

What are the odds that you can accomplish your dreams? What if you were given one in a million odds of making it happen? Would you give up? Aaron Baker was given a one in a million odds by his doctor of ever feeding himself again after a catastrophic spinal chord injury. Undeterred Aaron would start a journey to be that one in a million to beat the odds and reach his goal of reaching the Para Cycling National Championships. Watch his story in the award winning documentary All That I Am

Aaron has since finished the Para Cycling National Championships, cycled across the United States Twice, and walked across Death Valley. Aaron has founded the Center of Restorative Exercise so that others could receive the same kind of training he received to make his recovery. His center has since changed the lives of countless people who were counted out after strokes, spinal chord injuries, MS, Cerebral Palsy and other debilitating diseases and disorders. 

teenshealthandfitness:

Rehydrate yourself! Teenshealthandfitness.Tumblr.Com

teenshealthandfitness:

Rehydrate yourself!
Teenshealthandfitness.Tumblr.Com

lipz-sofrench-ass-sospanish:

ukrainianbarbiedoll:

♡♡♡

http://lipz-sofrench-ass-sospanish.tumblr.com/
10000steps:

This is going around again. I saw it in my dashboard with a whole lot of more notes before.

THESE ARE NOT MY WORDS, CREDIT GOES TO FITNESS-GODDESS:
This is so wrong physiologically that it hurts to read.
For those who want to know the actual physiology behind it:
In low intensity exercise (which is up to about 70% of your maximum intensity/max heart rate) you pull out triglycerides from adipose tissue and use a process of the metabolism called catabolism to breakdown those triglycerides into fatty acids for use by your muscles as fuel. That is when you burn literal stored adipose tissue aka fat. This happens before carb catabolism due to there being enough oxygen present to use fat catabolism and the fact that we are built for long-term storage; it’d be pretty unfortunate if we as a species used all of our macronutrients from one meal to fuel ourselves instead finding a way to store macronutrients for when food is scarce.
When you hit about 70% of your max however, you are no longer taking in enough oxygen to use fat catabolism and switch to carb catabolism from glycogen stores created by unused carbs. You are no longer directly burning fat ONLY because you’ve hit oxygen levels too low to do so by doing high intensity exercises. If you went back to low intensity, you’d switch back to fat catabolism. This is actually partially the reason why they say high intensity interval training is so effective.
All of this is paraphrased from the sixth edition Human Physiology textbook written by Dee Unglaub Silverthorne. So there’s your source if you’re anal about sources like I am.

10000steps:

This is going around again. I saw it in my dashboard with a whole lot of more notes before.

THESE ARE NOT MY WORDS, CREDIT GOES TO FITNESS-GODDESS:

This is so wrong physiologically that it hurts to read.

For those who want to know the actual physiology behind it:

In low intensity exercise (which is up to about 70% of your maximum intensity/max heart rate) you pull out triglycerides from adipose tissue and use a process of the metabolism called catabolism to breakdown those triglycerides into fatty acids for use by your muscles as fuel. That is when you burn literal stored adipose tissue aka fat. This happens before carb catabolism due to there being enough oxygen present to use fat catabolism and the fact that we are built for long-term storage; it’d be pretty unfortunate if we as a species used all of our macronutrients from one meal to fuel ourselves instead finding a way to store macronutrients for when food is scarce.

When you hit about 70% of your max however, you are no longer taking in enough oxygen to use fat catabolism and switch to carb catabolism from glycogen stores created by unused carbs. You are no longer directly burning fat ONLY because you’ve hit oxygen levels too low to do so by doing high intensity exercises. If you went back to low intensity, you’d switch back to fat catabolism. This is actually partially the reason why they say high intensity interval training is so effective.

All of this is paraphrased from the sixth edition Human Physiology textbook written by Dee Unglaub Silverthorne. So there’s your source if you’re anal about sources like I am.

50 Ways to Stay Motivated

body-y-soul:

  1. Think wellness, not weight loss. Do you only make good food choices when you are trying to lose weight? This could lead to rebound weight gain if you go back to your old habits once you’ve reached your goal. “You have to eat every day, so why not eat better every day?” advises Rania Batayneh, MPH.
  2. Set reasonable goals. Ask yourself if what you are trying to accomplish is reasonable. “Trying to achieve too much in too little time can actually set you back” warns Dr. Andrew Weil, Director of Integrative Health and Healing at Miraval Resort & Spa. Losing 50 pounds in 2 months is unreasonable, but losing 10 pounds in 2 months is.
  3. LIMIT but do not ELIMINATE. “Eliminating your favorite foods will just make you want/crave them more,” says Rania Batayneh, MPH. Instead, Batayneh suggests allowing yourself those less healthy choices, but finding a way to limit your intake (in portion or frequency) to avoid feelings of deprivation.
  4. Pace yourself. Taking on too much at once is a recipe for disaster. Instead of taking on a bunch of new tasks you aren’t exactly looking forward to (a new exercise plan, new strict eating regime), why not take bite-sized action steps? “Work on a task you’ve been postponing for ten minutes and then decide whether or not to continue. If you discontinue the task, schedule another time to get it done” suggests Dr. Andrew Weil, Director of Integrative Health and Healing at Miraval Resort.
  5. Try tipping your scales with blue. Did you know that the color blue is a known appetite suppressant? Why not use a little color to help you stay on track? “Eat your dinner on a blue plate and you’ll discover that you need less to feel full,” advises color intuitive expert Elizabeth Harper.
  6. Take stock of any and all of the positive changes new eating habits have brought you. Instead of focusing only on the changes you aren’t seeing yet (i.e. a drop in your scale weight), focus on the benefits you are noticing, like saving money by not wasting it on junk food, or your increased energy level from exercising, advises Valerie Berkowitz, author of The Stubborn Fat Fix.
  7. Celebrate the small victories! “Remember that fitness is more like a marathon than a sprint,” advises certified trainer Stacy Berman. “By setting small weekly or monthly goals you will be able to track your progress which will keep you motivated to continue as you reach them and step by step” says Berman. And once you’ve achieved a goal, no matter how small, celebrate it! You don’t always want to feel like you are far away from the finish line – celebrate each milestone as you achieve it along the way.
  8. Wear red to get going! “If your energy is low and you feel lackluster about a project or event (or working out?) then wear red,” suggests color intuitive expert Elizabeth Harper.According to Harper, red energizes your system, boosts your confidence and empowers you to action.
  9. Trick out your tracksuit! “Buy yourself some stylish workout gear that makes you look good”, suggests Kate Brown, Community Director for Daily Burn. “When you look good, you’ll feel good,” says Brown. Plus, you’ll be much more likely to put on your new gym outfit on those rough days (when its cold out/you are tired/its that time of the month, etc).
  10. Drop the “perfect” mentality. Did you slip up? Have a moment of weakness? That’s OK, says Valerie Berkowitz, Director of Nutrition for The Center for Balanced Health. “Use any splurge as motivation to get yourself back on track,” recommends Berkowitz. Rather than using it as an excuse to have a donut for breakfast, as in I cheated last night, I might as well keep cheating, simply tell yourself that you will recommit, and make up for it.

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